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Local Treasures Appraised at the Historical Society

by Paul Saulnier
November 18, 2017

Let's blame the Millennials.

Nancy Lamb, who oversees the society's collection of Holliston artifacts, introduced Ken Van Blarcom, noted appraiser of antiques and collectables (http://www.kwvbauctions.com/home/index.html), who donated his time for a fun afternoon of appraising treasures and commenting on the state of collecting today.

Ken broke the news about what used to be valued collectibles to our grandparents, parents and those present: land fill and targets. Prices have dropped dramatically in the last ten years. Why? Because Millennials have all the money and they don't want this stuff. "Brown furniture", as Ken calls it, is big and bulky and suitable for fire wood. But Millennials won't burn it. They just press a button on their IPhone and the gas-fired fireplace is up and running. Andirons, formally worth thousands of dollars -  anchors. "Millennials buy their furniture at Jordan's or Bob's", Ken said.

Remember Hummel? Ken said that when they show up in estate auction, The staff has fun throwing them at the wall. Sterling silver sets are worth their weight in silver so they are crushed and sold by the pound. Sets from Tiffany still have a little more value. Fancy china sets are now good for target practice. Wedgwood? You guessed it.

The market for Japanese items is almost nonexistent. Chinese items are not much better. Since governments declared ivory items illegal, they are not only worthless but owning something made of ivory could land you in slammer if documentation doesn't prove that the item was made before the ban. With that said, Ken set up to appraise the items brought by hopefuls.

Original oil paintings by famous artists are still valuable. Some have lost value but are coming back as the artists become more famous.

This mantle clock was made in 1903 for $3.00. Once worth $300.00 is now worth about $125.00 at auction. Grandfather clocks have suffered the same fate.

This copper tea pot, made in the late 1700s might bring a high bid of $75.00

Ken is holding a cut glass dish (identifiable by the sharp edges) that was worth $75.00 but now is worth about $5.00 so don't bother putting it in your will for your grandchildren.

The value for chairs like the walnut caned chair above, gain value the more there are. Alone this one is worth $60. Four matching chairs will bring the value up to $150.00 each.

A little good news for collectors of old toys in perfect condition. This 19th century windup toy is worth $800 - $1,200 at auction.

This vanity lamp, one of two made in the 1930s, is worth $35.00 on a good day. It cost more than that new.

Tomorrow I'm calling 1-800-GOT JUNK before they raise their prices because the landfills are full.

 

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Comments (1)

This FAKE NEWS article is not based in fact. Speaking for all millennial, we do not have money for new furniture, gas fireplaces, and avocado toast. We are living in an economy that is RIGGED by you old people. Sorry we don't want your weird lamp, your uncomfortable chairs, or your smelly couch that your cat peed on. I have so many student loans, the last thing I would buy is some old plate from someone who is probably homophobic and would not like me anyway because I am gay.

- Filacio Torres | 11/21/17 6:30 PM

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