Goff B. Heavner, Jr. at 92

On April 23, 2021 Goff B. Heavner, Jr. of Holliston, beloved father of five children, passed away at the age of 92.  Goff was born in Philippi, WV on May 19, 1928, to Goff and Lacie (Mick) Heavner.   

Goff was pre-deceased by his parents; his first wife, Jean (Ryerson) Heavner; his second wife Susan (Onorato) Heavner; his siblings Mildred, Reeta, Homer, Maxine, Geraldine, Shirley, Elda Jean, and Wilda; and his son Mark’s wife Katherine (Nickerson) Heavner. He is survived by his children, Susan Heavner of Austin TX, Mark Heavner of Holliston, Scott Heavner and his wife Kristine (Nielsen) of Holliston, Jane Heavner of Framingham, and Goff Heavner III (GB) of Blackstone.  He leaves seven grandchildren, Christine Hartnett of Austin, TX, Jeffrey Heavner of Medway, Ashley Duffy of Holliston, Derek Dennison of Holliston, Karly Heavner of Medway, Adam Dennison of Shrewsbury, Ryan Dennison of Natick, and 10 great grandchildren, Diego and Esme Barraz; Jack, Ryan, Ruby, and Cali Heavner; Thomas, Hannah, and Claire Duffy; and Kennedy Dennison. He also leaves behind many nieces and nephews; a dear family friend, Maureen Cormier; and the family of Goff’s second wife Susan, her brother Steven Onorato; her children Stephanie Lemon, Erik Tordoff and Adam Tordoff; her grandchildren Sabrina Garrahan, John Tordoff, Mackenzie Tordoff, and Samantha Tordoff; and her great grandson, Rory Garrahan. Goff and Susan had one son together, GB, as mentioned above. 

Goff spent the first 14 years of his life in West Virginia where his family lived on a farm. He went to school in a one-room school house and when he wasn’t in class, he and his siblings worked on the farm.  Depression-era times were hard, but Goff said they never went hungry because they grew and raised their own food. He always remembered his childhood with fondness. In 1942, he moved to Upton, MA with his parents and siblings and his new friends introduced him to baseball.  He said he “couldn’t hit beans from baseballs” but someone asked, “can you pitch?” He discovered he could throw the ball and “make it move.”  And thus began his love of baseball.  He started playing for the Upton Boys Club and later the Whitin Machine Works in the Blackstone Valley league.  He pitched briefly in the farm system of the Boston Braves. Later, he enjoyed coaching Little League.   

Goff was an avid candlepin bowler and appeared on the TV show Candle Pins for Cash.  He was a self-taught guitar player and one of his treasures was his Gibson guitar.  If you spent more than 30 minutes with him you likely heard the story about how he paid $5 for it in the early 1950s as a reward for a job well done.  Even at 92 he strummed that guitar several times a week. When he wasn’t strumming the guitar, he was playing cards.  

Goff had a long career in construction and took pride in his work as a heavy equipment operator. He lived a long life and we are all grateful for the stories he loved to share and his optimistic attitude as he aged.  He saw a lot of changes through his life and was fond of saying “everything’s different anymore” and he usually added, “but it’s better than ever.”  He will be missed by many.  

A memorial service will be planned for a later date.

Arrangements are under the care of the Chesmore Funeral Home of Holliston, www.ChesmoreFuneralHome.com

Chesmore Funeral Home

Leave a Comment





Categories